How USB bus number and device number been assigned?

When using lsusb, I realize that the bus number and device number of a USB device can change from time to time. From what I understand, the bus number can change on every reboot. The device number will change on every reconnect.

My question is what algorithm the system uses to get the bus number and device number? Especially the device number, is it monotonic? Will there ever be a case that without rebooting the OS, one reconnected device is using another reconnected device’s old bus number and device number?

Answers:

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Method 1

Note: This is a Linux answer; other kernels will have a slightly different way to deal with this.

Context:

It is difficult to talk about USB buses without talking about PCI buses. A CPU cannot directly talk to a USB bus but what happens is that the CPU talks to a PCI bus that has a USB controller connected to it (and a USB controller/hub is what lsusb calls a USB bus). PCI buses are numbered based on how far from the CPU they are, for example:

    +-----+
    | CPU |
    +-----+
       |              PCI Bus 0
 ---+--+-----------------------------+
    |                                |
+---+----+                      +----+---+
| Bridge |                      | Bridge |
+---+----+                      +----+---+
    |  PCI bus 1                     |  PCI bus 2
  --+--------+               +-------+-------------+
             |               |                     |
       Disk Controller    USB Controller      Network Card
         (Device 00)       (Device 00)         (Device 01)

Looking in man lspci we see the following:
   Slot   The  name of the slot where the device resides
          ([domain:]bus:device.function).  This tag is
          always the first in a record.

Therefore we now know how to interpret PCI numbers. Next, we will look at USB controllers connected to the PCI buses. The machine I am currently at has an interesting USB configuration so I’ll use it as an example:
$ lspci -tv
-[0000:00]-+-00.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] RS780 Host Bridge
           +-01.0-[01]----05.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] RS780M [Mobility Radeon HD 3200]
           +-04.0-[02]----00.0  Qualcomm Atheros AR928X Wireless Network Adapter (PCI-Express)
           +-05.0-[03]----00.0  Realtek Semiconductor Co., Ltd. RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller
           +-06.0-[04-06]--
           +-11.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 SATA Controller [IDE mode]
           +-12.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI0 Controller
           +-12.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0 USB OHCI1 Controller
           +-12.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB EHCI Controller
           +-13.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI0 Controller
           +-13.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0 USB OHCI1 Controller
           +-13.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB EHCI Controller
           +-14.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SBx00 SMBus Controller
           +-14.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 IDE Controller
           +-14.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA)
           +-14.3  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 LPC host controller
           +-14.4-[07]--
           +-14.5  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI2 Controller
           +-18.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] Family 11h Processor HyperTransport Configuration
           +-18.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] Family 11h Processor Address Map
           +-18.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] Family 11h Processor DRAM Controller
           +-18.3  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] Family 11h Processor Miscellaneous Control
           -18.4  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD] Family 11h Processor Link Control

Wait wait wait, what are all those pluses? At the top, we have the domain and the PCI bus -[0000:00] (this machine has only one PCI bus). And then we have several devices connected to that bus. Let’s see which ones are USB devices:
$ lspci -tv | grep -i usb
       +-12.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI0 Controller
       +-12.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0 USB OHCI1 Controller
       +-12.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB EHCI Controller
       +-13.0  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI0 Controller
       +-13.1  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0 USB OHCI1 Controller
       +-13.2  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB EHCI Controller
       +-14.5  Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] SB7x0/SB8x0/SB9x0 USB OHCI2 Controller

Good, now let us compare that against lsusb (I use sort just to make it easier to search the list later):
$ lsusb | sort
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 174f:5a31 Syntek Sonix USB 2.0 Camera
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 046d:c019 Logitech, Inc. Optical Tilt Wheel Mouse
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub
Bus 007 Device 002: ID 0b05:1751 ASUSTek Computer, Inc. BT-253 Bluetooth Adapter

Wait again. We have 7 USB devices according to lspci but 10 devices according to lsusb! lspci only lists the USB controllers; a controller can have more than one USB device attached to it. Let’s explore /sys/bus/ to see how this happens.
$ ls -l /sys/bus/usb/devices/
... 1-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.2/usb1/1-0:1.0
... 2-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.2/usb2/2-0:1.0
... 2-1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.2/usb2/2-1
... 2-1:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.2/usb2/2-1/2-1:1.0
... 2-1:1.1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.2/usb2/2-1/2-1:1.1
... 3-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb3/3-0:1.0
... 3-1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb3/3-1
... 3-1:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb3/3-1/3-1:1.0
... 4-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.1/usb4/4-0:1.0
... 5-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.0/usb5/5-0:1.0
... 6-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.1/usb6/6-0:1.0
... 7-0:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-0:1.0
... 7-1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-1
... 7-1:1.0 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-1/7-1:1.0
... 7-1:1.1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-1/7-1:1.1
... 7-1:1.2 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-1/7-1:1.2
... 7-1:1.3 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7/7-1/7-1:1.3
... usb1 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.2/usb1
... usb2 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.2/usb2
... usb3 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb3
... usb4 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.1/usb4
... usb5 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.0/usb5
... usb6 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:13.1/usb6
... usb7 -> ../../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:14.5/usb7

Now, this is starting to make sense: we have 7 USB controllers which are plugged into the PCI bus as devices. For example, the USB bus 001 corresponds to the PCI device 0000:00:12.2 and USB bus 007 corresponds to the 0000:00:14.5 device.

Device numbering:

The directories starting with the USB bus number (e.g. 7-1:1.2) are the actual devices connected to the USB controller. Just like a PCI bus can have several devices connected, a USB controller (a hub) can have several USB devices connected to it.

Device numbers are simply counters: the first device connected gets a 1, the next gets a 2, and so on. But there is a little more: USB was designed to be hot-pluggable; therefore you can connect and disconnect devices. When you disconnect a USB device, the device number will not be used by the kernel again for any other device on that USB controller. For example, if you connect and disconnect a pen drive and keep doing lsusb you will see the device number for your pen drive going up.

Bus numbering:

If you have read the above with attention, you might be wondering about one thing that I did not touch. The order of the PCI numbering does not correspond to the order in which the USB controllers were numbered! Let’s see that again:

USB  | PCI
-----+----
usb1 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.2
usb2 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.2
usb3 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.0
usb4 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.1
usb5 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.0
usb6 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.1
usb7 | 0000:00/0000:00:14.5

The list is in order, but not quite. The first two USB controllers seem to be out of order. Yet, there is a reason why: If you look closely at the output of lspci above, you will see that those are EHCI USB (USB 2.0), whilst all other USB controllers are OHCI USB (USB 1.x).

Therefore we can redraw this table as:

USB  | PCI
-----+----
usb1 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.2
usb2 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.2     USB 2.0
-----+---------------------------------
usb3 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.0     USB 1.x
usb4 | 0000:00/0000:00:12.1
usb5 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.0
usb6 | 0000:00/0000:00:13.1
usb7 | 0000:00/0000:00:14.5

And the number assignment becomes clear!


All methods was sourced from stackoverflow.com or stackexchange.com, is licensed under cc by-sa 2.5, cc by-sa 3.0 and cc by-sa 4.0

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